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. "washington journal" is next. >> it was not a serious proposal. right now we are almost no wear. ♪ host: on the subject of the fiscal cliff, john boehner declares a stalemate. this is the headline in an article from politico. the major sticking points remain the same, congressional democrats want to raise taxes on the highest income earners while keeping the current lower tax rates in place for the middle class. republicans want to extend tax breaks at all levels. good morning and welcome to "washington journal." we are going to be talking about the fiscal cliff, the statements the house speaker made about being a stalemate and what the president said during his trip to a toy factory in pennsylvania. here are the numbers. you can also reach out to us by e-mail and twitter and facebook, all of the social media as. on twitter the addresses @cspanwj, facebook.com/cspan. more from the article by jake sherman with the headline " fiscal cliff." he writes -- let's go to the phones. the first call comes from debbie in flint, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a l
if taxes go up in 2013. host: flags all around washington, d.c. are at half staff this morning like the one you are feeling on the capital. good morning and welcome to "washington journal." for the first hour we will be talking about the aftermath of the shooting of in newtown, conn that happened yesterday. we will talk about the actions of the teachers. we will get into discussion about gun-control. that always seems to come up after situations like this. we would like for you to get involved in the conversation. the numbers are on the screen. we want to hear from teachers and people who work in the classrooms, principals and vice principals, people connected with education to find your thoughts on what happened yesterday. the actions of the teachers. how safe are in america's schools and america's schoolchildren. this is how the story is being played this morning on the front page of the "new york daily news." this is the way it is being reported this morning in "the wall street journal." the president talked about the shootings at the elementary school calling it a hate crime and vowing
in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation. so the numbers on your screen. guest: we also have a special line this morning for members of the n.r.a. (202)585-3883 this is for n.r.a. members. you can also reach out to us at twitter.com/cspanwj and f.s.a. -- and facebook at and the headline face of the n.r.a. mountains a forceful defense advocate of armed school guards excels at lighting fires under supporters and critics alike. guest: we'll get back to more of the newspaper articles this morning regarding the n.r.a.'s response to the newtown shoot
sequestration of the states. "washington >> mr. president, i rise with real heavy starter. our friend dan just died. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] >> a democrat of hawaii, a highly decorated wofford war two combat veteran and the second longest senator in history died on monday. the senate passed a resolution naming patrick leahy as new president pro temps, the third in line to the presidency. good morning, everyone, on this tuesday, december 18, 2012, as senators say goodbye to their longtime colleague yesterday, they will be welcoming a new senator from the state of south carolina. and tim scott has been tapped to replace jim demint. and the papers reporting progress being made about the so-called fiscal cliff talk. first, we return to the tragedy to discuss mental health issue in this country. what should be the role of the federal and state government if any in mental health? also send us a tweet, twitter.com c-spanwj or facebook .com/c-span
distinguished career in congress advocating on behalf of those voices who were often drowned out in washington by the influence of the moneyed interest. over the last 40 years, congressman stark has been one of the foremost advocates on behalf on efforts to ensure that americans were able to access quality, affordable health insurance. i am honored to have been one of the three principaled co- authors in the house of the historic affordable care act which will provide quality insurance for every single american. the key role mr. stark in drafting that law and made sure that the law provided needed relief for working families. this was a crucial accomplishment, yet it was far from mr. stark's only accomplishment in the field of health care. as a former chair and ranking democrat on the ways and means health subcommittee for many years, he was a leader on the health care reform. he was a lead author of the original cobra insurance bill which ensured that workers faced with losing their jobs would not also immediately lose access to the needed health insurance. and those of us who have gone throu
of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more than the democrats. president obama is basically going to do with the people voted him in for. i think he wil
the department of homeland security program that gives money to recover from a terrorist incident. "washington journal," is next. [video clip] >> we cannot tolerate this any more. these tragedies must end. we must change, to end them. host: president obama at last night's interfaith prayer vigil in newtown, connecticut, speaking to the community hit by friday's elementary school shootings. it's monday, december 17, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congression
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
goldfarb to take questions about text extenders at 8:30 eastern. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: we will spend about two hours this morning on the "washington journal" talking about the fiscal cliff. we want to start off hearing from you on a different topic. what do you think about hillary clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we hav
an update on the hurricane sandy relief bill making its way through congress. "washington journal" is next. >> nobody will get 100% of what they want. let's make sure middle-class families and the american economy and the world economy are not adversely impacted because people cannot do their jobs. host: the headline in this morning's "washington post" -- president obama and senate leaders were on the verge of an agreement that would let taxes rise on the wealthiest households while protecting the vast majority of americans from tax hikes set to hit in january. welcome to the saturday edition of "and the washington journal." for the first 45 minutes of the program we are going to be talking about senate negotiating a fiscal clifts deal, what has been going on on that half of the capital. see what they are talking about and how things are going. we want to get your input and your part of the conversation. you can reach out to us on twitter. facebook, facebook.com/cspan. and you can send us an e-mail. this is more from the article, the lead story in "the washington post." they ride, the deve
and politico reporters on the role of lobbyists in those negotiations. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. both parties are reportedly still talking on the phone. as the deadline approaches, we are two weeks before christmas. eric cantor leaving open the possibility of of a post session. let's look of the numbers. the fiscal cliff deadline 22 days away. we want to begin with a look ahead at the second term agenda. in your mind, what did you think should be the number one priority. we will take your calls and comments. you can also join us on facebook and twitter. from the headlines this morning, including this from the washington post. there is also this story from "the huffington post." aspirations' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video
at 9:15, more about the role of social security. ♪ host: good morning. welcome to "washington journal" on this wednesday, december 12, 2012. negotiations continue over the so-called looming fiscal cliff. yesterday president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. washington post reported however that they are still working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax
are presenting that we can either contact or -- ? >> yes, peter bareez -- peter de vries of washington state and tom harkin in the senate. i have just come to our door tom harkin because he is like a voice of rationality in understanding the economics and burnie of the legal rules -- and making sure we have liberals for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is v
on the fiscal cliff. this morning "washington journal" talk to a business representative about his take on the negotiations. host: let's begin with what is business forward, how did it come about? guest: is simple mission. our job is to make it easier for business leaders in the country who care about policy issues but did not have a washington office or a lobbyist, to speak about the issues of public policy. host: is this a brand-new organization? who is involved? >> we have been around 3 1/2 years, supported by some of the biggest companies of the world, with business leaders are in the country. we go out to small business owners, entrepreneurs, venture capitalist to get them involved in policy-making. what we do is we bring administration officials, members of congress, governors out to cities around the country to be briefings with business leaders. what we also do is bring the business leaders to washington. we tell them how to grow jobs and accelerate. host: what did the business leaders say to the president and how did it come about? guest: we have been doing this for a year, bri
host: the two-hour washington journal this morning. the house and is in at 9:00. open telephones for any public policy issue you would like to discuss. you can see the numbers on your screen. you can also contact us on twitter, facebook, or by e-mail. you can see the addresses on your screen. let's start with an update on the so called "fiscal cliff." this is the washington post -- in a side arbucarticle -- that the washington post report on the fiscal cliff this morning. here's an article from "washington times" -- now this is from "politico." a situation that was in the paper couple weeks ago. looks li finally, before we go to phone calls, this article from the daily caller -- again, that is reported in the daily caller. we begin with a call from diane in julian, california, on our democratic line. caller: good morning, peter. my prediction came true, reelecting a president. women against violence acts, being held up by the house. john boehner and the republican house majority leader eric cantor. i tweeted last night quiet late saying the republicans are going to gang up on joh
u.s. energy information society and the center for strategic and international studies. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. it is friday, december 7, 2012. the 71st anniversary on the attack of pearl harbor. reaction continues this morning over yesterday's resignation announcement of jim demint. the approach and fiscal clift deadline continues to loom over congress and the white house. that is where we want to begin. is it ok for leaders to compromise, or should they stick to their principles and would it be ok if doing so sent us over the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media websites. a very good morning to you. i want to begin with the question of compromise or sticking to principle. this is a question a gallup organization asked in a recent poll. it found 62% of americans would like to see the federal government leaders compromise on an agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff budget measures set to go into effect next month. more than twice the 25% who want leaders to stick to their principles. a m
foundation, one of the great conservative think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of so my reaction for the people of south carolina is -- you have lost a great, strong conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity, and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a - he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point
. on the darkest day of 1990 in washington, d.c., i began my ministry. that is something people don't realize, especially those who attack those who work with the indigent or support for the struggling -- or the poor. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand. let me give my personal example. i live on $6.66 a day. that is food stamps. that is for single adults. i live on social security, $774 a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal st
. and in -- the next step is for them to send it to six different places in washington, d.c., but the main thing is they send a record of this to the senate. the senate than tallies them, puts them in two mahogany boxes. one box and -- they send it to the house of representatives where they officially open up the boxes and the elopes and at that point, count to see who has won. host: c-span will be covering the meetings in ohio and north carolina and coverage starts at noon eastern time with the ohio electoral college. 53rd meeting in columbus. you can watch the proceedings live from the ohio statehouse senate chamber on c-span 3. we will also be watching north carolina as its electoral college meets and it is all on our website, c-span.org. go there to find out more. james thurber, does anything unexpected happen when electoral college day occurs? we saw the voting process in november. are electoral college delegates committed? can anything different happen? guest: yes, something different can happen. in 24 states they are required to vote the ticket that they are running on, these electors. so
would help the federal regime. >> they look to washington over the next few years and see that the ideas are not working. they're dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, which we know they will, the friends of freedom here in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready, not with political ideas but with american ideas, ideas that we know are working and can point to and show that they're working for 100% of americans. that's what i'm going to be doing the next few years. i'm not getting out of the fight. i'm raising my game. i know that i have got a partner now in tim scott as well as lindsey graham and governor haley and all of you that are here today. i am so grateful for the opportunity to serve. i promise you and i'm going to keep serving and fighting in the same way that you have seen in the past. thank you. [applause] >> and i can tell you that one of the things as i travel across the country, everyone always wants to know how in the world we got the best federal delegation in the country. all i tell them is that south carolina is blessed. we
temperature government accountability office. we are privileged to have as a witness paula hammond, washington state chair. and a light leader sheikh -- leadership group. then mr. edward hamberger. and ann schneider. i like to welcome all of the. we appreciate your patience. we have had some lively discussion today. there is a lot of interest in passenger rail service inner- city and high speed. we look forward to your contribution. if you have a lengthy statement that extends beyond five minutes, without objection it will all be considered as part of the record and included in the record. we welcome you. we will now begin and we will start with mitchell behm, the inspector general for rail maritime economic analysis at the department of transportation. >> mr. chairman, members of the committee, thank you for inviting me to testify in the implementation of the nation's high-speed intercity passenger rail program. since we raised concerns in 2010 about fra's ability to meet this challenge, we have seen them make no progress in implementing the program. it is only dispersed through 8% of the fun
time. that does it for today's "washington journal." will be back tomorrow. the live coverage of the house of representatives live on c- span. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 18, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable nan s. hayworth to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the house will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. i have been directed by the house -- sflat that the house that the senate has passed a bill in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other t
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
washington city, there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly are inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor of inspiring. but the answer. the congressman dave said, the building served a purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become a permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite photos in the president's home and photographs and history. watch at 7:30 on american history tv. john boehner's office described a meeting with president obama as a frank talk. he spoke to reporters about fiscal cliff negotiations, criticizing president obama for not being serious on cutting spending and lending herrmann the lack of an agreement. lawmakers have less than three weeks before the bush era tax cuts are set to expire and mandatory spending cuts take effect. this is about 10 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. more than five weeks ago, republicans signaled our willingness to avert the fiscal cliff with a bipartisan ag
those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as we have. >> today the 18 members of ohio 's electro college pass their votes for president barack obama -- now ohio possible electoral college -- of ohio's elecroral college passed their votes for president barack obama. courtesy of the ohio channel, this is 40 minutes. >> this is the 53rd meeting of the ohio electoral college. i would like to thank you for coming and welcome you to these procedures. i would like all who are gathered here today to stand for a moment of silent prayer or reflection for the victims, their families and our country as we mourn the deaths of the children and school officials in newtown, connecticut. >> thank you. to lead us through the taiex thank you. to lead us through the preliminary matters and to provide us with a welcoming address, i would like to pass the gavel to congresswoman elect, joyc
cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka pata, and allison schwartz. i just finished getting a tour of the connects workshop. i have to say,
in washington, thanks to you to the bank of america. thanks to you, john, and thanks to your colleagues. so you may have gotten cards. we're be bringing you into the conversation. so be thinking about what you're going to ask. so without further ado, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward. [applause] >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a bestseller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff, negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's groundhog day. the question is who's playing bill murray. and i mean, such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines. so where this goes, i think anyone who thinks they know is wrong. some people say it's a fiscal cliff. some people say it's a slope. some say it's a bungee jump. some say it's a skateboard trip. it's going to go down and up and so forth. bottom line, i think, it's no way to govern. it is a giant mis
, i have to get to washington to convey the thoughts and the minds of my constituents not only the average citizens but doctors who i sat down with yesterday to ask about this question. but here's my point. now you can look at'9" globally, then i'm going to narrow it down. globally one would say that we're living longer. of course women are -- this is the actuarial genius here. you know the actuarial table you teal with. women are living longer, it's always been a tradition, etc., but the body politic is living longer maybe because they're healthier. that is not the case in the span of what we're speaking of. what we're talking about tpwhreblely or nationally are people who -- whose beginnings are different, whose lifestyles were different, now i don't know that the family farmer, and i'm not picking on that group of people, they work with their hands. of course they work with their minds, they have to have a budget, mange things work but they're in the outdoors. foresters. some would say that's a healthy lifestyle. i don't know if if -- until you walk a mile in their shoes. th
in washington on dealing with our economy and national debt and the eerie silence in congress as the list of horrific dwb gun crimes grows by the day. i'm encouraged by seralf my colleagues who have spoken out today. drad ition traddation -- traditionally they've been the side of those who opposed any limitation on firearms but they believe after newtown, connecticut, we have to reopen that conversation in a good faith effort to find common ground. too many colleagues shrug their shoulders when vot come to the floor for a vote. they feel duty bound to vote right on every scorecard issue. my wife and i grew up in downstate illinois with families of hunters. we know the rite of passage when a father takes his son or daughter out hunting the first time. i know fun of watching the sun come up on a duck blind and aring a seasoned hunter calling them over the water. the hunters i know are good people. they le their sport and they hate those who misuse firearms to tryst and -- terrorize and kill. we need these hunters to join with americans who never owned or used a gun to establish a reasonable
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
amendment rights of the constitution. host: there is this headline in "the washington post" this morning. host: does that need to be looked at as well? guest: we had much more of a country that still restricted alcohol after prohibition four decades ago. that is one reason atf has fewer agents. canada tried to register the firearms and tried for over 10 years and finally dropped it. that didn't work out. i am not saying we shouldn't keep better records. fbi and other agencies should look at the background of everyone. i am not an expert in all these areas. having this debate where everybody blames the gun and everybody says it is the people involved on the other side, that is too simplistic. we have to put everything on the table. we can debate everything. we should debate our mental health situation. connecticut does not allow forced medication for people that are mentally ill. and our gun-free zone policy, which obviously has not worked. host: "the washington post" also notes -- host: joe from maryland. caller: my name is joe and i'm watching this on the news and everything. i make vie
and effort of reining in spending and -- in washington. i'm proud of our efforts to introduce the first bipartisan budget in a generation. i want to thank steve latourette and jim cooper for their efforts and leadership on this. i also want to thank congressman quigley to co-sponsor and advance this legislation, which is based on the bipartisan simpson-bowles framework. this budget ultimately failed to pass the house, but i remain proud of our bipartisan effort for which the u.s.a. today called us the brave 38. and i believe this type of thoughtful independent leadership that this is the type of leadership that the 10th district deserves. i also believe that the courage and leadership shown by the house to take on the difficult, but necessary position of reining entitlement spending deserves recognition. we know that medicare stands out as a primary driver of our debt in the future. and unfortunately, this future is not so far off. with one of medicare's key programs scheduled to go bankrupt in the next 10 to 12 years, sustaining the status quo means dramatic cuts down the road on the v
council permanent member who deseptember ily seems to sell one thing to washington and yet another to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this l
shootings, indicating they plan to hold a major news conference in the washington area this friday. we'll keep you posted on that. conversation from this morning's "washington journal" next, as we wait for the house to gavel in around 6:00 p.m. eastern for a series of four votes on the issues of the connecticut shooting and gun control from this morning. host: what do you make of that? guest: we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study that looked comprehensively at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semiautomatics, used between 2% and 8% of crimes and instead the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. it's a very emotional one. at least an emotional issue -- emotional an issue as the death penalty or abortion. we h
. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 4, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable gregg harper to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. defazio, for five minutes. mr. defazio: well, yesterday the republicans released a vague press release saying it constituted a counteroffer to the president's road map to avoid driving over the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific numbe
people and get beyond their pledge to a special interest lobbyist here in washington, d.c. although, frankly, i fail to see how avoiding to cut taxes violates the pledge to never raise taxes. we need to defeat the previous question. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. session: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i'd like to remind the gentleman that the republicans have already passed the bill for the middle class tax cut on august 1 of this year and passed 256-171. we are now waiting for the senate to act on that. i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves his time. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, the vice chairman of the democrat caucus, mr. becerra. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. becerra: i thank the gentlelady for yielding. if you're in the middle class, shouldn't it feel like you're in the middle of america? yet the politics of extremism is pushing the middle class to the very edge. the
now. why do i bring this up? is there anybody in washington, d.c. who is talking about cutting tax rates? and the answer is no. there's really not. there's not one person in this chamber who comes to the floor and talks about cutting tax rates. we might like to but we're in a tough economic crisis right now and folks are concerned about the revenue side of the equation. what folks are talking about, though, is not raising tax rates. for some reason, for reasons that i can't understand, mr. speaker, the president has gotten wrapped around the axle on an insistence that actual rates go up. speaker john boehner offered him revenue he said if you just want the money, we'll find a way to get money through taxes, it doesn't have to be through higher rates, we can do it through eliminating loopholes and exemses, broadening the base. the president said i want higher rates. when we're not talking about higher rate fless white house, mr. speaker, we're talking about fairness. i've got to tell you, mr. speaker, dadgummit, you and i are freshmen in this body, we came with the largest freshmen
meeting with president obama. and then nancy pelosi. >> friday morning on washington journal, nina olson will discuss with the impending fiscal clause means for tax filing season. and then sarah kliff discusses medicare payments. jennifer ortman and william rey, demographers. 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> as president of? begins his second term in office, what is the most important issue he should consider for 2013? >> make a short video about your message to the president. >> with your chance to win a grand prize of $5,000. $50,000 and total prizes. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> harry reid and democratic leaders spoke to reporters about the fiscal cliff negotiations. it also focused on the senate democratic agenda including hurricane sandy legislation. this is 20 minutes. >> with every passing day, the republicans are calling on john boehner to guarantee tax cuts to the middle class. today, sen. cornyn will be the second ranking republican next congress. they'll call upon john bennett to the reasonable thing. they will have this below sooner or later. those rates go up by
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
negotiations in washington. we will show you remarks from president obama at the white house and senate majority leader harry reid and mitch mcconnell on the senate floor. first, an update on where negotiations stand after the meeting between president and congressional leaders at the white house. >> steven dennis joins us from the role call as a white house reporter. stephen, how did the meeting between the president and congressional leaders go? >> i think it was a meeting where they may be set the framework for getting a short- term deal to avert tax increases for most americans, extend unemployment benefits, and maybe take care of a few other small things. at this point, it is a race against the clock and it is up to harry reid and mitch mcconnell and the senate to see if they can have a bipartisan compromise. the president said if he cannot come up with something in the next couple days, he wants harry reid to bring a bill to the floor that would do with the president wants to do, which is tax increases, extend unemployment benefits, etcetera, at least get a vote on it. harry reid
. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> i rise to recognize the outstanding service of jay johnson of the department of defense in navigating a wide range of important legal issues, he's been an invaluable partner to the house aarped services committee. over the last four years he advised the committee on numerous national security challenges including cyberwarfare, counterterrorism operation the legal boundaries in the conflict against al qaeda, and detainee operations worldwide. he was integral tour efforts to reform military commissions for those -- with those accused of planning and executing the 9/11 attacks will be tried. he's created briefings on don't ask, don't tell, efforts to combat sexual assault in the military, changes to the combat exclusion policy, the member of the joint chiefs staff and the withdrawal of troops from iraq. there's been no shortage of difficult and controversial issues. he's always approached them intell
. until then, part of our conversation on this morning's "washington journal" about the impact of medicare about the fiscal cliff negotiations. host: and here on "washington journal," we are going to continue our look that we've done over the last couple of weeks at the so-called fiscal cliff and its impact on taxes and spending and some other issues. and today we're focusing on the issue of medicare, and our guest is mary agnus carey, senior health care correspondent for the kaiser health care news. mary agnus, just as a reminder for our viewers, how is medicare funded? guest: well, medicare has part a is funded by payroll taxes, gets taken out of their checks. part b and d. part b is your outpatient service and part d is prescription drugs and it's funded by yn revenue. host: is it self-sustaining? does it pay for itself? guest: in the sense general revenues pays for it, its needs are met and then the medicare trustees says the program is funded through 2024 in part because of the reductions in the health care law to providers and here we're talking about the part a trust fund. as we kno
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